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Phenazopyridine

Why is this medication prescribed?

Phenazopyridine relieves urinary tract pain, burning, irritation, and discomfort, as well as urgent and frequent urination caused by urinary tract infections, surgery, injury, or examination procedures. However, phenazopyridine is not an antibiotic; it does not cure infections.
How should this medication be used?

Phenazopyridine comes as a tablet or capsule to take by mouth. It usually is taken three times a day after meals. Do not chew or crush the tablets; swallow them whole with a full glass of water. You may stop taking this drug when pain and discomfort completely disappear. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take phenazopyridine exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor.
Are there other uses for this medicine?

This medication is sometimes prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.
Other names

* Azo-100®
* Azo Gantanol® (as a combination product containing Phenazopyridine, Sulfamethoxazole)
* Azo Gantrisin® (as a combination product containing Phenazopyridine, Sulfisoxazole)
* Azo-Gesic®
* Azo-Standard®
* Azo-Truxazole® (as a combination product containing Phenazopyridine, Sulfisoxazole)
* Baridium®
* Eridium®
* Geridium®
* Phenazo®
* Prodium®
* Pyrelle HB® (as a combination product containing Hyoscyamine, Phenazopyridine, Secbutabarbital)

* Pyridium®
* Pyridium Plus® (as a combination product containing Hyoscyamine, Phenazopyridine, Secbutabarbital)
* Re-Azo®
* Tija® (as a combination product containing Oxytetracycline, Phenazopyridine, Sulfamethizole)
* Urelief Plus® (as a combination product containing Hyoscyamine, Phenazopyridine, Secbutabarbital)
* Uricalm®
* Urinary Analgesic®
* Uristat®
* Urobiotic-250® (as a combination product containing Oxytetracycline, Phenazopyridine, Sulfamethizole)
* Urodol®
* Urogesic®
* Viridium®



What special precautions should I follow?

Before taking phenazopyridine,

* tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to phenazopyridine or any other drugs.
* tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications you are taking, including vitamins.
* tell your doctor if you have or have ever had kidney disease or glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency (an inherited blood disease).
* tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking phenazopyridine, call your doctor.


What side effects can this medication cause?

Phenazopyridine may cause side effects. Your urine may turn a red-orange or brown; this effect is harmless. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

* headache
* dizziness
* upset stomach

If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately:

* yellowing of the skin or eyes
* fever
* confusion
* skin discoloration (blue to bluish-purple)
* shortness of breath
* skin rash
* sudden decrease in the amount of urine
* swelling of the face, fingers, feet, or legs

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online [at http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch] or by phone [1-800-332-1088].
What should I do if I forget to take a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one.
What should I do in case of overdose?

In case of overdose, call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, call local emergency services at 911.
What storage conditions are needed for this medication?

Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Throw away any medication that is outdated or no longer needed. Talk to your pharmacist about the proper disposal of your medication.
What other information should I know?

Keep all appointments with your doctor and the laboratory. Your doctor will order certain lab tests to check your response to phenazopyridine.

Phenazopyridine can interfere with laboratory tests, including urine tests for glucose (sugar) and ketones. If you have diabetes, you should use Clinitest rather than Tes-Tape or Clinistix to test your urine for sugar. Urine tests for ketones (Acetest and Ketostix) may give false results. Before you have any tests, tell the laboratory personnel and doctor that you take this medication.

Phenazopyridine stains clothing and contact lenses. Avoid wearing contact lenses while taking this medicine.

Do not let anyone else take your medication. Your prescription is probably not refillable.

If you still have symptoms after you finish the phenazopyridine, call your doctor.

It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.

Pyrethrin and Piperonyl Butoxide

Why is this medication prescribed?

Pyrethrin with piperonyl butoxide kills parasites and their eggs. It is used to treat scabies (a skin infestation) and lice infestations of the head, body, and pubic area ('crabs'). Pyrethrin with piperonyl butoxide does not prevent these infestations.
How should this medication be used?

The pyrethrin and piperonyl butoxide combination comes in liquid, gel, and shampoo form. Usually, one application of pyrethrin with piperonyl butoxide is effective. However, the treatment may need to be repeated after 1 week; call your doctor if signs of infestation (live parasites) reappear. Follow the directions on the package or on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Use pyrethrin and piperonyl butoxide exactly as directed. Do not use more or less of it or use it more often than directed by your doctor.

Wear rubber gloves when applying it if you have open cuts or scratches on your hands. If this medication accidentally gets in your eyes, rinse them thoroughly with water for at least 5 minutes.

To use the liquid or gel, follow these steps:

1. Use enough medication to cover the affected hairy area and adjacent areas. Ask your pharmacist or doctor any questions you have about where to apply the medication.
2. Leave the medication on for exactly 10 minutes.
3. Thoroughly wash the area with warm water and soap or regular shampoo.
4. Dry with a clean towel.
5. Wash your hands to remove the medication.
6. Dress in clean clothes.

To use the shampoo, follow these steps:

1. Shake the shampoo before using it. Then thoroughly cover your dry hair and scalp or skin with shampoo.
2. Use a small amount of water to work the shampoo into your hair until a lather forms.
3. Leave the shampoo on for exactly 10 minutes.
4. Rinse your hair thoroughly with water.
5. Dry your hair with a clean towel.
6. Comb your hair with a fine tooth comb to remove nits (lice eggs and larvae).
7. Wash your hands to remove the medication.

If you have head lice, wash combs and brushes with the liquid, gel, or shampoo and rinse them thoroughly with water to remove the drug.
Other names

* A-200 Lice Control® Topical Spray (as a combination product containing Piperonyl Butoxide, Pyrethrin)
* Lice-X Liquid® Topical Solution (as a combination product containing Piperonyl Butoxide, Pyrethrin)
* Pronto® (as a combination product containing Piperonyl Butoxide, Pyrethrin)
* Pyrinyl® (as a combination product containing Piperonyl Butoxide, Pyrethrin)
* R & C® (as a combination product containing Piperonyl Butoxide, Pyrethrin)

* RID® Medicated Shampoo (as a combination product containing Piperonyl Butoxide, Pyrethrin)
* Stop Lice® Maximum Strength Medicated Shampoo (as a combination product containing Piperonyl Butoxide, Pyrethrin)
* Tegrin-LT® (as a combination product containing Piperonyl Butoxide, Pyrethrin)
* Triple X Pediculicide® Medicated Shampoo (as a combination product containing Piperonyl Butoxide, Pyrethrin)



What special precautions should I follow?

Before using pyrethrin and piperonyl butoxide,

* tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to pyrethrin, piperonyl butoxide, ragweed, petroleum products, or any other drugs.
* tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications you are taking, including vitamins.
* tell your doctor if you are pregnant or are breast-feeding. If you are pregnant, wear gloves when applying this medication to another person to prevent its absorption through your skin.


What side effects can this medication cause?

Pyrethrin and piperonyl butoxide may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

* skin irritation
* rash
* redness
* swelling

What storage conditions are needed for this medication?

Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Throw away any medication that is outdated or no longer needed. Talk to your pharmacist about the proper disposal of your medication.
What other information should I know?

Keep all appointments with your doctor. Pyrethrin and piperonyl butoxide is for external use only. Do not let pyrethrin and piperonyl butoxide get into your eyes, nose, or mouth, and do not swallow it. Do not apply dressings, bandages, cosmetics, lotions, or other skin medications to the area being treated unless your doctor tells you.

After using pyrethrin and piperonyl butoxide, machine-wash (or dry clean) all clothing, bed linen, and towels that you have used in the last 2 days. Use hot water. Dry everything in a hot dryer for at least 20 minutes. Thoroughly clean all bathtubs, showers, and toilets in your home with rubbing alcohol.

You may have transmitted the parasites to family members and close contacts (including sexual contacts); advise them to see a doctor if they develop symptoms of infestation.

If you have scabies and your skin has become sensitive to the parasite, itching may persist for several weeks after the treatment. However, this itching does not mean that the treatment was a failure. Call your doctor if you have questions.

Do not let anyone else use your medication. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about pyrethrin and piperonyl butoxide.

It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.

Phenazopyridine

Why is this medication prescribed?

Phenazopyridine relieves urinary tract pain, burning, irritation, and discomfort, as well as urgent and frequent urination caused by urinary tract infections, surgery, injury, or examination procedures. However, phenazopyridine is not an antibiotic; it does not cure infections.
How should this medication be used?

Phenazopyridine comes as a tablet or capsule to take by mouth. It usually is taken three times a day after meals. Do not chew or crush the tablets; swallow them whole with a full glass of water. You may stop taking this drug when pain and discomfort completely disappear. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take phenazopyridine exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor.
Are there other uses for this medicine?

This medication is sometimes prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.
Other names

* Azo-100®
* Azo Gantanol® (as a combination product containing Phenazopyridine, Sulfamethoxazole)
* Azo Gantrisin® (as a combination product containing Phenazopyridine, Sulfisoxazole)
* Azo-Gesic®
* Azo-Standard®
* Azo-Truxazole® (as a combination product containing Phenazopyridine, Sulfisoxazole)
* Baridium®
* Eridium®
* Geridium®
* Phenazo®
* Prodium®
* Pyrelle HB® (as a combination product containing Hyoscyamine, Phenazopyridine, Secbutabarbital)

* Pyridium®
* Pyridium Plus® (as a combination product containing Hyoscyamine, Phenazopyridine, Secbutabarbital)
* Re-Azo®
* Tija® (as a combination product containing Oxytetracycline, Phenazopyridine, Sulfamethizole)
* Urelief Plus® (as a combination product containing Hyoscyamine, Phenazopyridine, Secbutabarbital)
* Uricalm®
* Urinary Analgesic®
* Uristat®
* Urobiotic-250® (as a combination product containing Oxytetracycline, Phenazopyridine, Sulfamethizole)
* Urodol®
* Urogesic®
* Viridium®



What special precautions should I follow?

Before taking phenazopyridine,

* tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to phenazopyridine or any other drugs.
* tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications you are taking, including vitamins.
* tell your doctor if you have or have ever had kidney disease or glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency (an inherited blood disease).
* tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking phenazopyridine, call your doctor.


What side effects can this medication cause?

Phenazopyridine may cause side effects. Your urine may turn a red-orange or brown; this effect is harmless. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

* headache
* dizziness
* upset stomach

If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately:

* yellowing of the skin or eyes
* fever
* confusion
* skin discoloration (blue to bluish-purple)
* shortness of breath
* skin rash
* sudden decrease in the amount of urine
* swelling of the face, fingers, feet, or legs

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online [at http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch] or by phone [1-800-332-1088].
What should I do if I forget to take a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one.
What should I do in case of overdose?

In case of overdose, call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, call local emergency services at 911.
What storage conditions are needed for this medication?

Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Throw away any medication that is outdated or no longer needed. Talk to your pharmacist about the proper disposal of your medication.
What other information should I know?

Keep all appointments with your doctor and the laboratory. Your doctor will order certain lab tests to check your response to phenazopyridine.

Phenazopyridine can interfere with laboratory tests, including urine tests for glucose (sugar) and ketones. If you have diabetes, you should use Clinitest rather than Tes-Tape or Clinistix to test your urine for sugar. Urine tests for ketones (Acetest and Ketostix) may give false results. Before you have any tests, tell the laboratory personnel and doctor that you take this medication.

Phenazopyridine stains clothing and contact lenses. Avoid wearing contact lenses while taking this medicine.

Do not let anyone else take your medication. Your prescription is probably not refillable.

If you still have symptoms after you finish the phenazopyridine, call your doctor.

It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.

Acetaminophen and Codeine

Why is this medication prescribed?

This combination of drugs is used to relieve mild to moderate pain.

This medication is sometimes prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.
How should this medication be used?

The combination of acetaminophen and codeine comes as a tablet, capsule, and liquid to take by mouth. It usually is taken every 6 hours as needed. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take acetaminophen and codeine exactly as directed.

Codeine can be habit-forming. Do not take a larger dose, take it more often, or for a longer period than your doctor tells you to.
Other names

* Capital® & Codeine (as a combination product containing Acetaminophen, Codeine)
* Cocet® (as a combination product containing Acetaminophen, Codeine)
* Codrix® (as a combination product containing Acetaminophen, Codeine)
* Colrex® (as a combination product containing Acetaminophen, Chlorpheniramine, Codeine, Phenylephrine)
* Combiflex® ES (as a combination product containing Acetaminophen, Codeine, Magnesium Salicylate, Phenyltoloxamine)
* Cotabflu® (as a combination product containing Acetaminophen, Chlorpheniramine, Codeine)
* Fioricet® with Codeine (as a combination product containing Acetaminophen, Butalbital, Caffeine, Codeine)
* Margesic® #3 (as a combination product containing Acetaminophen, Codeine)
* Maxiflu® (as a combination product containing Acetaminophen, Codeine, Guaifenesin, Pseudoephedrine)

* Phenaphen® with Codeine (#3, #4) (as a combination product containing Acetaminophen, Codeine)
* Phenco-Care® (as a combination product containing Acetaminophen, Codeine)
* Phenflu® (as a combination product containing Acetaminophen, Codeine, Guaifenesin, Phenylephrine)
* Phrenilin® with Caffeine, Codeine (as a combination product containing Acetaminophen, Butalbital, Caffeine, Codeine)
* Pyregesic® (as a combination product containing Acetaminophen, Codeine)
* Tylagesic® (as a combination product containing Acetaminophen, Codeine)
* Tylenol® with Codeine (#2, #3, #4) (as a combination product containing Acetaminophen, Codeine)
* Vopac® (as a combination product containing Acetaminophen, Codeine)



What special precautions should I follow?

Before taking acetaminophen and codeine,

* tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to acetaminophen, codeine, sulfite or any other drugs.
* tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications you are taking, especially acetaminophen (Tylenol); antidepressants; medications for cough, cold, or allergies; other pain relievers; sedatives, sleeping pills, tranquilizers; and vitamins.
* tell your doctor if you have or have ever had liver or kidney disease, a history of alcoholism, lung or thyroid disease, prostatic hypertrophy, or urinary retention.
* tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking acetaminophen and codeine, call your doctor.
* if you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you are taking acetaminophen and codeine.
* you should know that this drug may make you drowsy. Do not drive a car or operate machinery until you know how this drug affects you.
* remember that alcohol can add to the drowsiness caused by this drug.


What side effects can this medication cause?

Acetaminophen and codeine may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

* dizziness
* lightheadedness
* drowsiness
* upset stomach
* vomiting
* constipation
* stomach pain
* rash
* difficulty urinating

If you experience either of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately:

* difficulty breathing
* mood changes

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online [at http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch] or by phone [1-800-332-1088].
What should I do if I forget to take a dose?

This medication usually is taken as needed. If your doctor has told you to take acetaminophen and codeine regularly, take the missed dose as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one.
What should I do in case of overdose?

In case of overdose, call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, call local emergency services at 911.
What storage conditions are needed for this medication?

Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Throw away any medication that is outdated or no longer needed. Talk to your pharmacist about the proper disposal of your medication.
What other information should I know?

Keep all appointments with your doctor.

Too much acetaminophen may cause liver damage; do not take more than 4000 mg of acetaminophen per day.

Do not let anyone else take your medication. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about refilling your prescription.

It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.

Pyrazinamide

Why is this medication prescribed?

Pyrazinamide kills or stops the growth of certain bacteria that cause tuberculosis (TB). It is used with other drugs to treat tuberculosis.

This medication is sometimes prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.
How should this medication be used?

Pyrazinamide comes as a tablet to take by mouth. It usually is taken once a day (at the same time each day) or in larger doses twice a week. Pyrazinamide may be taken with or without food. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your pharmacist or doctor to explain any part you do not understand. Take pyrazinamide exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

What special precautions should I follow?

Before taking pyrazinamide,

* tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to pyrazinamide, niacin, ethionamide (Trecator-SC), or any other drugs.
* tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications you are taking, especially allopurinol (Zyloprim), colchicine and/or probenecid (Col-Probenecid, Benemid), ethionamide (Trecator-SC), and vitamins.
* tell your doctor if you have or have ever had gout, liver or kidney disease, or diabetes.
* tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking pyrazinamide, call your doctor.
* plan to avoid unnecessary or prolonged exposure to sunlight and to wear protective clothing, sunglasses, and sunscreen. Pyrazinamide may make your skin sensitive to sunlight.


What side effects can this medication cause?

Pyrazinamide may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

* upset stomach
* fatigue

If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately:

* skin rash
* fever
* vomiting
* loss of appetite
* yellowing of the skin or eyes
* darkened urine
* pain and swelling in the joints
* unusual bleeding or bruising
* difficult urination

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online [at http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch] or by phone [1-800-332-1088].
What should I do if I forget to take a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and take only your regularly scheduled dose. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one.
What should I do in case of overdose?

In case of overdose, call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, call local emergency services at 911.
What storage conditions are needed for this medication?

Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Throw away any medication that is outdated or no longer needed. Talk to your pharmacist about the proper disposal of your medication.
What other information should I know?

Keep all appointments with your doctor and the laboratory. Your doctor will order certain lab tests to check your response to pyrazinamide.

If you have diabetes, pyrazinamide may interfere with urine ketone tests. If you use urine ketone tests, check with your doctor about using other types of tests while taking pyrazinamide.

Do not let anyone else take your medication. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about refilling your prescription.

It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.

Pyrantel

Why is this medication prescribed?

Pyrantel, an antiworm medication, is used to treat roundworm, hookworm, pinworm, and other worm infections.

This medication is sometimes prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.
How should this medication be used?

Pyrantel comes as a capsule and a liquid to take by mouth. It usually is taken as a single dose for pinworm and roundworm infections. The dose usually is repeated after 2 weeks for pinworm infections. For hookworm infections, pyrantel usually is taken once a day for 3 days. Pyrantel may be taken with food, juice, or milk or on an empty stomach.

Shake the liquid well to mix the medication evenly. Pyrantel may be mixed with milk or fruit juice. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take pyrantel exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor.
Other names

* Ascarel®
* Pin-X®

* Reese's® Pinworm Medicine
* Reese's® Pinworm Medicine Caplets®


What special precautions should I follow?

Before taking pyrantel,

* tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to pyrantel or any other drugs.
* tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications you are taking, especially piperazine (another antiworm medication), and vitamins.
* tell your doctor if you have or have ever had anemia or liver disease.
* tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking pyrantel, call your doctor.

What side effects can this medication cause?

Pyrantel may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

* upset stomach
* vomiting
* diarrhea
* loss of appetite
* stomach cramps
* stomach pain
* straining and pain during bowel movements

What should I do if I forget to take a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one.
What storage conditions are needed for this medication?

Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Throw away any medication that is outdated or no longer needed. Talk to your pharmacist about the proper disposal of your medication.
What other information should I know?

Keep all appointments with your doctor and the laboratory. Your doctor will order certain lab tests to check your response to pyrantel.

Do not let anyone else take your medication. Your prescription is probably not refillable. If you still have symptoms of infection after you finish the pyrantel, call your doctor.

It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.

Pylera

Why is this medication prescribed?

Bismuth subsalicylate, metronidazole, and tetracycline combination is used to treat duodenal ulcers. It fights infection by Helicobacter pylori bacteria, which often occurs with ulcers. Treating this infection keeps ulcers from coming back. It usually is used in combination with other ulcer medicines.

This medication is sometimes prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.
How should this medication be used?

Bismuth subsalicylate, metronidazole, and tetracycline combination comes as four pills: two pink, round, chewable tablets (bismuth subsalicylate), one white tablet (metronidazole), and one pale orange and white capsule (tetracycline). It usually is taken four times a day at meals and bedtime. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take this medication exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

Chew and swallow the bismuth subsalicylate tablets. Swallow the metronidazole tablet and tetracycline capsule whole with a full glass of water (8 ounces [240 milliliters]). Avoid taking this medication with dairy products or milk. Take the bedtime dose with plenty of fluid to prevent irritation of your throat and stomach.

Continue to take this medication even if you feel well. Most people will take it for 14 days. Do not stop taking it without talking to your doctor.
Other names

* Helidac® (as a combination product containing Bismuth Subsalicylate, Metronidazole, Tetracycline)

* Pylera® (as a combination product containing Bismuth Subcitrate, Metronidazole, Tetracycline)


What special precautions should I follow?

Before taking bismuth subsalicylate, metronidazole, and tetracycline combination,

* tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to bismuth subsalicylate, metronidazole (Flagyl), aspirin or salicylates, tetracycline, or any other drugs.
* tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications you are taking, especially oral contraceptives and medications that contain aspirin, antibiotics, or anticoagulants ('blood thinners') such as warfarin (Coumadin), and vitamins.
* tell your doctor if you have or have ever had kidney, blood, liver, or Crohn's disease.
* tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. This medication may make oral contraceptives less effective. Use a different form of birth control while taking it. If you become pregnant while taking this medication, call your doctor immediately. Tetracycline can cause birth defects and may harm nursing babies.
* remember not to drink alcoholic beverages while taking this medication and for at least 1 day after treatment is finished. Metronidazole causes severe vomiting and illness when taken before or after drinking alcohol.
* plan to avoid unnecessary or prolonged exposure to sunlight and to wear protective clothing, sunglasses, and sunscreen. This medication may make your skin sensitive to sunlight.


What side effects can this medication cause?

Bismuth subsalicylate, metronidazole, and tetracycline combination may cause side effects. Darkening of the tongue and stool is temporary and harmless. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

* headache
* blurred vision
* dizziness
* nausea
* diarrhea
* constipation
* loss of appetite
* stomach discomfort

If you have any of the following symptoms, stop taking this medication and call your doctor immediately:

* numbness in your hands or feet
* seizures
* confusion or agitation
* ringing in the ears
* bloody, black, or tarry stools

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online [at http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch] or by phone [1-800-332-1088].
What should I do if I forget to take a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one. If you miss more than four doses, call your doctor.
What should I do in case of overdose?

In case of overdose, call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, call local emergency services at 911.
What storage conditions are needed for this medication?

Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Throw away any medication that is outdated or no longer needed. Talk to your pharmacist about the proper disposal of your medication.
What other information should I know?

Keep all appointments with your doctor and the laboratory. Your doctor may order certain lab tests to check your response to this medication.

Do not let anyone else take your medicine. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about refilling your prescription.

It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.

Mercaptopurine

About your treatment

Your doctor has ordered the drug mercaptopurine to help treat your illness. The drug is taken by mouth in tablet form.

This medication is used to treat:

* leukemia

This medication is sometimes prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Mercaptopurine belongs to a group of drugs known as antimetabolites. It resembles a normal cell nutrient needed by cancer cells to grow. The cancer cells take up mercaptopurine which then interferes with their growth.
Are there other uses for this medicine?

Mercaptopurine is also used to treat many types of autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, acute idiopathic polyneuritis, acute idiopathic nephrotic syndrome, psoriatic arthritis, erythroid aplasia, or myelofibrosis; idiopathic hemolytic anemia; macroglobulinemia; idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura; idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis; multiple sclerosis; myasthenia gravis; uveitis; and ulcerative colitis. Talk to your doctor about the possible risks of using this drug for your condition.
Other names

* Purinethol®

What special precautions should I follow?

Before taking mercaptopurine,

* tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to mercaptopurine or any other drugs.
* tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications you are taking, especially allopurinol (Zyloprim), anticoagulants ('blood thinners') such as warfarin (Coumadin), aspirin, and vitamins.
* you should know that mercaptopurine may interfere with the normal menstrual cycle (period) in women and may stop sperm production in men. However, you should not assume that you cannot get pregnant or that you cannot get someone else pregnant. Women who are pregnant or breast-feeding should tell their doctors before they begin taking this drug. You should not plan to have children while receiving chemotherapy or for a while after treatments. (Talk to your doctor for further details.) Use a reliable method of birth control to prevent pregnancy. Mercaptopurine may harm the fetus.
* do not have any vaccinations (e.g., measles or flu shots) without talking to your doctor.


What side effects can this medication cause?

Side effects from mercaptopurine are common and include:

* headache
* weakness or achiness
* darkening of the skin
* loss of appetite or weight

Tell your doctor if either of these symptoms is severe or lasts for several hours:

* mouth blistering
* fatigue

If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately:

* painful urination or red urine
* black, tarry stools
* diarrhea
* pain in the abdomen
* unusual bruising or bleeding
* shortness of breath
* swelling of the feet or legs
* cough
* fever
* sore throat
* nausea and vomiting
* rash
* yellowing of the skin or eyes
* joint pain

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online [at http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch] or by phone [1-800-332-1088].

Dornase Alfa

Why is this medication prescribed?

Dornase alfa is used to reduce the number of lung infections and to improve lung function in patients with cystic fibrosis. It breaks down the thick secretions in the airways, allowing air to flow better and preventing bacteria from building up.

This medication is sometimes prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.
How should this medication be used?

Dornase alfa comes as a solution to inhale by mouth. It usually is taken one or two times a day. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Use dornase alfa exactly as directed. Do not use more or less of it or use it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

Dornase alfa is used to treat cystic fibrosis but does not cure it. Continue to use dornase alfa even if you feel well. Do not stop using dornase alfa without talking to your doctor.

Before you use dornase alfa the first time, read the written instructions that come with it. Ask your doctor, pharmacist, or respiratory therapist to demonstrate the proper technique. Practice using the nebulizer while in his or her presence. Only use a nebulizer that is recommended by your doctor.
Other names

* Pulmozyme®


What side effects can this medication cause?

Dornase alfa may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away.

* voice changes
* sore throat
* hoarseness
* eye irritation
* rash

If you experience either of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately.

* increased difficulty breathing
* chest pain

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online [at http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch] or by phone [1-800-332-1088].
What should I do if I forget to take a dose?

Use the missed dose as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not use a double dose to make up for a missed one.
What storage conditions are needed for this medication?

Keep this medicine in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it in the refrigerator and protect it from sunlight. Do not expose the drug to room temperature for more than 24 hours. Any ampule that has been open for more than 24 hours should be discarded. Discard ampules if the solution is cloudy or discolored. Talk to your pharmacist about the proper disposal of medicine that is outdated or no longer needed.
What other information should I know?

Keep all appointments with your doctor and the laboratory. Your doctor may order certain lab tests to check your response to dornase alfa.

Do not dilute or mix dornase alfa with other drugs in the nebulizer.

Inhalation devices require regular cleaning. Follow the manufacturer's written instructions for the care of the nebulizer.

Do not let anyone else use your medication. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about refilling your prescription.

It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.

Budesonide Oral Inhalation

Why is this medication prescribed?

Budesonide is used to prevent wheezing, shortness of breath, and troubled breathing caused by severe asthma and other lung diseases. It belongs to a class of drugs called corticosteroids.

This medication is sometimes prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.
How should this medication be used?

Budesonide comes as a powder to inhale by mouth. Budesonide is usually inhaled once or twice a day. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Use budesonide exactly as directed. Do not use more or less of it or use it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

Budesonide controls symptoms of asthma and other lung diseases but does not cure them. Improvement in your asthma may occur as soon as 24 hours after taking the medication, but full effects may not be seen for 1 to 2 weeks after taking it regularly. Continue to use budesonide even if you feel well. Do not stop using budesonide without talking to your doctor. Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve during the first 2 weeks or if they get worse.

Do not use budesonide for rapid relief of asthma attacks. If you do not have another inhaler for prompt relief of breathing difficulties, ask your doctor to prescribe one. If your doctor has prescribed a bronchodilator (a drug to be inhaled for rapid relief of difficult breathing such as albuterol [Proventil, Ventolin]), use it several minutes before you use your budesonide. This helps the budesonide get into the deeper parts of your lungs. Call your doctor immediately if your asthma is not responding to usual treatment.

Before you use budesonide the first time, read the written directions that come with it. Ask your doctor, pharmacist, or respiratory therapist to show you the right way to use the inhaler. Practice using the inhaler in front of him or her, so you are sure you are doing it the right way.

To use the inhaler, follow these steps:

1. Turn the protective cover and lift it off.
2. The first time you use a new budesonide inhaler you must prime it. To do this, hold the inhaler upright (with mouthpiece up), then twist the brown grip fully to the right as far as it will go, then back again fully to the left. You will hear a click. Repeat. The unit is now primed and ready to load the first dose. You do not have to prime the inhaler again after this, even if you do not use it for a long time.
3. Holding the inhaler upright, load the first dose by turning the grip fully to the right and fully to the left until it clicks.
4. Turn your head away from the inhaler and breathe out. Do not blow or exhale into the inhaler. Do not shake the inhaler after loading it.
5. Hold the inhaler in the upright (mouthpiece up) or horizontal position. Place the mouthpiece between your lips well into your mouth, past your front teeth. Tilt your head slightly back. Close your lips tightly around the mouthpiece and inhale deeply and forcefully. Be sure that the mist goes into your throat and is not blocked by your teeth or tongue. Adults giving the treatment to young children may hold the child's nose closed to be sure that the medication goes into the child's throat.
6. Remove the inhaler from your mouth and hold your breath for about 10 seconds. Do not exhale through the inhaler.
7. If you take two puffs (inhalations), wait 2 minutes before taking the second puff.
8. For the next puff and all other puffs, you do not have to prime the inhaler. However, it must be loaded in the upright position right before its use. Turn the grip fully to the right and then fully to the left until it clicks.
9. Replace the protective cap on the inhaler. After each treatment, rinse your mouth with water, but do not swallow the water.

Keep the inhaler clean and dry at all times. Do not bite or chew the mouthpiece. Do not use Pulmicort Turbuhaler with a spacer.
Other names

* Pulmicort®

* Symbicort® (as a combination product containing Budesonide, Formoterol)

What special precautions should I follow?

Before using budesonide inhalation powder,

* tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to budesonide or any other drugs.
* tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications you are taking, especially arthritis medications; aspirin; cimetidine (Tagamet); digoxin (Lanoxin); diuretics ('water pills'); estrogen (Premarin); ketoconazole (Nizoral); oral contraceptives (birth control pills); oral corticosteroids; phenobarbital (Donnatal, others); phenytoin (Dilantin); rifampin (Rifadin); theophylline (Theo-Dur); and vitamins or herbal products.
* if you have a fungal infection (other than on your skin), or any other type of infection, do not use budesonide without talking to your doctor.
* tell your doctor if you have or have ever had diabetes; thyroid problems; high blood pressure; mental illness; myasthenia gravis; osteoporosis; herpes eye infection; seizures; tuberculosis; ulcers; or liver, kidney, intestinal, or heart disease.
* tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while using budesonide, call your doctor.
* if you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you are taking budesonide.
* avoid exposure to chicken pox and measles. If you are exposed to them while using budesonide, call your doctor. Do not have a vaccination or other immunization unless directed to by your doctor.

What special dietary instructions should I follow?

Unless your doctor tells you otherwise, continue your normal diet.


What side effects can this medication cause?

Budesonide may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

* dry or irritated mouth or throat
* cough
* difficult or painful speech
* dizziness
* difficulty falling asleep or staying asleep
* neck pain
* stomach pain

If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately:

* vision problems
* white spots or sores in your mouth
* swollen face, lower legs, or ankles
* cold or infection that lasts a long time
* muscle weakness
* increased difficulty in breathing
* skin rash
* unusual bleeding or bruising
* fever
* sore throat
* pain during urination
* muscle aches

If you have been switched from oral corticosteroids to budesonide and are slowly tapering off your dose of the oral medication and you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately:

* joint or muscle pain
* increased difficulty in breathing
* tiredness

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online [at http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch] or by phone [1-800-332-1088].
What should I do if I forget to take a dose?

Take the missed dose as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one.
What storage conditions are needed for this medication?

Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Throw away any medication that is outdated or no longer needed. Talk to your pharmacist about the proper disposal of your medication.
What other information should I know?

Keep all appointments with your doctor and the laboratory.

If your sputum (the stuff that you cough up during an asthma attack) thickens or changes color from clear white to yellow, green, or gray, call your doctor; these may be signs of an infection.

Only a small amount of the budesonide powder is released into your lungs when you inhale. Therefore, you may not taste or sense the presence of any medication, but the medication will be working in your lungs.

When there are 20 doses left in the budesonide inhaler, a red mark will appear in the indicator window. This is the time to get your budesonide inhaler refilled. When the red mark reaches the bottom of the window, your inhaler is empty. Discard it. (You may still hear a sound if you shake it; this sound is not the medication. It is the drying agent inside the inhaler.)

Breathing or inhalation devices require regular cleaning. Follow the written directions for care and cleaning that comes with the inhaler.

Do not let anyone else take your medication. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about refilling your prescription.

It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.


Important warning

If you are switching (or have recently switched) from an oral corticosteroid such as budesonide, betamethasone, dexamethasone, methylprednisolone, prednisolone, or prednisone to budesonide inhalation and suffer an injury, infection, or a severe asthma attack, take a full dose of the oral corticosteroid (even if you have been gradually decreasing the dose) and call your doctor for more directions.

Always carry an identification card that says you may need supplementary doses of an oral corticosteroid during periods of stress (injuries, infections, and severe asthma attacks). Ask your pharmacist or doctor how to get this card. List your name, medical problems, drugs and dosages, and doctor's name and telephone number on the card. Include the name of the oral corticosteroid and the full dose you took before decreasing it.

Brompheniramine

Why is this medication prescribed?

Brompheniramine relieves red, irritated, itchy, watery eyes; sneezing; and runny nose caused by allergies, hay fever, and the common cold. Brompheniramine helps control symptoms, but does not treat the cause of the symptoms or speed recovery. Brompheniramine should not be used to cause sleepiness in children. Brompheniramine is in a class of medications called antihistamines. It works by blocking the action of histamine, a substance in the body that causes allergic symptoms.
How should this medication be used?

Brompheniramine comes in combination with other cough and cold medications as a chewable tablet, an extended-release (long-acting) capsule, an extended-release (long-acting) tablet, and a liquid to be taken by mouth. The chewable tablet and liquid are usually taken every 4 to 6 hours as needed. The extended-release tablets and capsules are usually taken every 8 or 12 hours as needed. Follow the directions on the package label or on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take brompheniramine exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than directed by the package label or prescribed by your doctor.

Brompheniramine comes in combination with other cough and cold medications. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for advice on which product is best for your symptoms. Check nonprescription cough and cold product labels carefully before taking two or more products at the same time. These products may contain the same active ingredient(s) and taking them together could cause you to receive an overdose. This is especially important if you will be giving cough and cold medications to a child.

Nonprescription cough and cold combination products, including products that contain brompheniramine, can cause serious side effects or death in young children. Do not give these products to children younger than 6 years of age. If you give these products to children 6-11 years of age, use caution and follow the package directions carefully.

If you are giving a product that contains brompheniramine to a child, read the package label carefully to be sure that it is the right product for a child of that age. Do not give brompheniramine products that are made for adults to children.

Before you give a brompheniramine product to a child, check the package label to find out how much medication the child should receive. Give the dose that matches the child's age on the chart. Ask the child's doctor if you don't know how much medication to give the child.

If you are taking the liquid, do not use a household spoon to measure your dose. Use the measuring spoon or cup that came with the medication or use a spoon made especially for measuring medication.

If you are taking the extended-release tablets or capsules swallow them whole; do not crush, break, or chew them.

Stop taking brompheniramine and call your doctor if your symptoms last longer than 7 days or if you have a fever.
Are there other uses for this medicine?

This medication is sometimes prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.
Other names

* AccuHist® PDX (as a combination product containing Brompheniramine, Dextromethorphan, Guaifenesin, Phenylephrine)
* Alacol® (as a combination product containing Brompheniramine, Phenylephrine)
* Alenaze-D® (as a combination product containing Brompheniramine, Phenylephrine)
* Allanhist® PDX (as a combination product containing Brompheniramine, Dextromethorphan, Guaifenesin, Phenylephrine)
* Balacall® DM (as a combination product containing Brompheniramine, Dextromethorphan, Phenylephrine)
* Betatan® (as a combination product containing Brompheniramine, Carbetapentane, Phenylephrine)
* Bromaphedrine® (as a combination product containing Brompheniramine, Phenylephrine)
* Bromhist® PDX (as a combination product containing Brompheniramine, Dextromethorphan, Guaifenesin, Phenylephrine)
* Bromtuss® DM (as a combination product containing Brompheniramine, Dextromethorphan, Phenylephrine)
* Brovex®
* Brovex® DM (as a combination product containing Brompheniramine, Dextromethorphan, Phenylephrine)
* Dimaphen® DM (as a combination product containing Brompheniramine, Dextromethorphan, Phenylephrine)
* Dimetane®
* Dimetane® Decongestant (as a combination product containing Brompheniramine, Phenylephrine)
* Dimetapp® DM Cold & Cough (as a combination product containing Brompheniramine, Dextromethorphan, Phenylephrine)
* Duravent-DPB® (as a combination product containing Brompheniramine, Dextromethorphan, Phenylephrine)
* Endacof AC® (as a combination product containing Brompheniramine, Codeine)

* EndaCof-DH® (as a combination product containing Brompheniramine, Dihydrocodeine, Phenylephrine)
* J-Tan® D (as a combination product containing Brompheniramine, Phenylephrine)
* J-Tan® PD
* Lohist-DM® (as a combination product containing Brompheniramine, Dextromethorphan, Phenylephrine)
* Lortuss® DM (as a combination product containing Brompheniramine, Dextromethorphan, Phenylephrine)
* Nalex® AC (as a combination product containing Brompheniramine, Codeine)
* Pulmari® (as a combination product containing Brompheniramine, Carbetapentane, Phenylephrine)
* Seradex® (as a combination product containing Brompheniramine, Carbetapentane, Phenylephrine)
* Siltane®
* Trexbrom® (as a combination product containing Brompheniramine, Carbetapentane, Phenylephrine)
* Tusdec® DM (as a combination product containing Brompheniramine, Dextromethorphan, Phenylephrine)
* Tusnel® (as a combination product containing Brompheniramine, Dextromethorphan, Guaifenesin)
* Vazobid® (as a combination product containing Brompheniramine, Phenylephrine)
* Vazol®
* Vazotan® (as a combination product containing Brompheniramine, Carbetapentane, Phenylephrine)
* V-Cof® (as a combination product containing Brompheniramine, Carbetapentane, Phenylephrine)
* V-Hist® (as a combination product containing Brompheniramine, Phenylephrine)


What special precautions should I follow?

Before taking brompheniramine,

* tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to brompheniramine or any other medications.
* tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention any of the following: medications for colds, hay fever, or allergies; medications for depression or seizures; monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitors such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam, Zelapar), and tranylcypromine (Parnate); muscle relaxants; narcotic medications for pain; sedatives; sleeping pills; and tranquilizers.
* tell your doctor if you have or have ever had asthma, emphysema, chronic bronchitis, or other breathing problems; glaucoma (a condition in which increased pressure in the eye can lead to gradual loss of vision); ulcers; difficulty urinating (due to an enlarged prostate gland); heart disease; high blood pressure; seizures; or an overactive thyroid gland.
* tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking brompheniramine, call your doctor.
* if you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you are taking brompheniramine.
* you should know that this medication may make you drowsy. Do not drive a car or operate machinery until you know how this medication affects you.
* talk to your doctor about the safe use of alcohol while you are taking brompheniramine. Alcohol can make the side effects of brompheniramine worse.

What special dietary instructions should I follow?

Unless your doctor tells you otherwise, continue your normal diet.


What side effects can this medication cause?

Brompheniramine may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

* drowsiness
* dry mouth, nose, and throat
* nausea
* headache
* chest congestion

Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately:

* vision problems
* difficulty urinating

Brompheniramine may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual problems while you are taking this medication.

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online [at http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch] or by phone [1-800-332-1088].
What should I do if I forget to take a dose?

Brompheniramine is usually taken as needed. If your doctor has told you to take brompheniramine regularly, take the missed dose as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one.
What should I do in case of overdose?

In case of overdose, call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, call local emergency services at 911.
What storage conditions are needed for this medication?

Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Throw away any medication that is outdated or no longer needed. Talk to your pharmacist about the proper disposal of your medication.
What other information should I know?

Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about brompheniramine.

It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.


Important warning

FDA Intends to Remove Some Unapproved Cough, Cold, and Allergy Drugs from the Market

This safety alert does not apply to this medication, but only to some products which contain this medication. In addition, it is important that you know that there is not a problem with most of the products described in this medication monograph. And some drug companies may decide to seek full approval from the FDA so that they can continue marketing their products.

On March 2, 2011, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a safety alert about certain unapproved prescription cough, cold, and allergy products containing this drug in combination with other drugs. These products are not currently approved by the FDA for safety, effectiveness, and quality. FDA asked drug companies to stop shipping most of these products for sale in the US within the next 6 months. Although some of these products have been marketed for many years, laws about what a company must prove to FDA for drug product approval have gotten tougher and increased enforcement of these laws is now taking place. The FDA took this action due to concerns about certain potential risks associated with use of these medications. These risks may include:

the possibility of improper use in infants and young children

potentially risky combinations of ingredients

patients receiving too much or too little of the medication because of problems with the way some ''timed-release'' products are made

If you are concerned that the prescription cough, cold, and allergy medication you are taking is not approved by the FDA, you should talk to your doctor or pharmacist. If the medication you are taking is not approved, your doctor can prescribe another prescription medication or your doctor or pharmacist can suggest an over-the-counter (OTC) cough, cold, and allergy product for your condition. There are many safe and effective alternative approved products that can be taken instead. Your doctor probably prescribed the medicine without knowing that FDA had not approved it. This is because it has been so difficult for doctors and pharmacists to find out that these products are unapproved. For additional information:

You can visit the FDA website (http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm244852.htm) for more information about this action to remove unapproved cough, cold, and allergy products from the market.

You can find a list of unapproved products by going to (http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch/SafetyInformation/SafetyAlertsforHumanMedicalProducts/ucm245279.htm).

For information on how to dispose of unused products, go to http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm101653.htm.

Psyllium

Why is this medication prescribed?

Psyllium, a bulk-forming laxative, is used to treat constipation. It absorbs liquid in the intestines, swells, and forms a bulky stool, which is easy to pass.

This medication is sometimes prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.
How should this medication be used?

Psyllium comes as a powder, granules, capsule, liquid, and wafer to take by mouth. It usually is taken one to three times daily. Follow the directions on the package or on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take psyllium exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

The powder and granules must be mixed with 8 ounces (240 milliliters) of a pleasant tasting liquid, such as fruit juice, right before use. Chew wafers thoroughly. For psyllium to work properly and to prevent side effects, you must drink at least 8 ounces (240 milliliters) of liquid when you take it.

Do not take psyllium for longer than 1 week unless your doctor tells you to.
Are there other uses for this medicine?

Your doctor also may prescribe psyllium to treat diarrhea or high cholesterol. Talk to your doctor about the possible risks of using this drug for your condition.
Other names

* Alramucil®
* Cilium®
* Fiberall®
* Genfiber®
* Hydrocil®
* Konsyl®
* Maalox Daily Fiber Therapy®
* Metamucil®
* Modane Bulk® (as a combination product containing Glucose, Psyllium)
* Natural Fiber Therapy®

* Natural Vegetable®
* Perdiem® (as a combination product containing Psyllium, Senna)
* Perdiem Fiber®
* Reguloid®
* Serutan®
* Syllact®
* Syllamalt® (as a combination product containing Malt soup extract, Psyllium)
* Uni-Laxative®
* V-Lax®


What special precautions should I follow?

Before taking psyllium,

* tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to psyllium or any other drugs.
* tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications you are taking, including vitamins. Do not take digoxin (Lanoxin), salicylates (aspirin), or nitrofurantoin (Macrodantin, Furadantin, Macrobid) within 3 hours of taking psyllium.
* tell your doctor if you have or have ever had diabetes mellitus, heart disease, high blood pressure, kidney disease, rectal bleeding, intestinal blockage, or difficulty swallowing.
* tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking psyllium, call your doctor.
* tell your pharmacist or doctor if you are on a low-sugar or low-sodium diet.
* be careful not to breathe in psyllium powder when mixing a dose. It can cause allergic reactions when accidentally inhaled.

What special dietary instructions should I follow?

To prevent constipation, drink plenty of fluids, exercise regularly, and eat a high-fiber diet, including whole-grain (e.g., bran) cereals, fruits, and vegetables.


What side effects can this medication cause?

Psyllium may cause side effects. If you have any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately:

* difficulty breathing
* stomach pain
* difficulty swallowing
* skin rash
* itching
* nausea
* vomiting

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online [at http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch] or by phone [1-800-332-1088].
What should I do if I forget to take a dose?

If you are taking scheduled doses of psyllium, take the missed dose as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one.
What storage conditions are needed for this medication?

Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Throw away any medication that is outdated or no longer needed. Talk to your pharmacist about the proper disposal of your medication.
What other information should I know?

Ask your doctor or pharmacist any questions you have about taking this medicine.

It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies

Diflorasone Topical

Why is this medication prescribed?

Diflorasone is used to treat the itching, redness, dryness, crusting, scaling, inflammation (swelling), and discomfort of various skin conditions. Diflorasone is in a class of medications called topical steroids. It works by reducing inflammation and itching.
How should this medication be used?

Diflorasone comes as a cream and an ointment to apply to the skin. It is usually applied to the affected area one to three times a day. To help you remember to use diflorasone, apply it around the same time every day. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Use diflorasone exactly as directed. Do not use more or less of it or use it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

Wash or soak the affected area thoroughly before applying the medicine, unless it irritates your skin. Then apply the ointment or cream sparingly in a thin film and rub it in gently.

If you are using diflorasone on your face, keep it out of your eyes.

If you are using diflorasone on a child's diaper area, do not use tight-fitting diapers or plastic pants. Such use may increase side effects.

Do not apply cosmetics or other skin preparations on the treated area without talking with your doctor.

Do not wrap or bandage the treated area unless your doctor tells you to. If your doctor tells you to wrap or bandage the treated area, follow these instructions:

1. Soak the area in water or wash it well.
2. While the skin is moist, gently rub the medication into the affected areas.
3. Cover the area with plastic wrap (such as Saran Wrap or Handi-Wrap). The plastic may be held in place with a gauze or elastic bandage or adhesive tape on the normal skin beside the treated area. (Instead of using plastic wrap, plastic gloves may be used for the hands, plastic bags for the feet, or a shower cap for the scalp.)
4. Carefully seal the edges of the plastic to make sure the wrap adheres closely to the skin. If the affected area is moist, you can leave the edges of the plastic wrap partly unsealed or puncture the wrap to allow excess moisture to escape.
5. Leave the plastic wrapping in place as long as instructed by your doctor. Usually plastic wraps are left in place not more than 12 hours each day.
6. Cleanse the skin and reapply the medication each time a new plastic wrapping is applied.

Are there other uses for this medicine?

This medication may be prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.
Other names

* Psorcon®

* Psorcon E® Emollient Cream

What side effects can this medication cause?

Diflorasone may cause side effects. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately:

* skin burning, itching, or irritation
* dry skin
* rash
* increased hair growth
* skin discoloration

Long-term use of diflorasone may cause children to grow more slowly. Talk to your doctor about the risks of using this medication.

Diflorasone may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual problems while using this medication.

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online [at http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch] or by phone [1-800-332-1088].
What should I do if I forget to take a dose?

Apply the missed dose as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not apply a double dose to make up for a missed one.
What storage conditions are needed for this medication?

Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Throw away any medication that is outdated or no longer needed. Talk to your pharmacist about the proper disposal of your medication.
What other information should I know?

Keep all appointments with your doctor and the laboratory. Your doctor may order certain lab tests to check your body's response to diflorasone.

Do not let anyone else use your medication. Do not use this medication for a skin condition other than the one for which it was prescribed. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about refilling your prescription.

It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.

Diflorasone Topical

Why is this medication prescribed?

Diflorasone is used to treat the itching, redness, dryness, crusting, scaling, inflammation (swelling), and discomfort of various skin conditions. Diflorasone is in a class of medications called topical steroids. It works by reducing inflammation and itching.
How should this medication be used?

Diflorasone comes as a cream and an ointment to apply to the skin. It is usually applied to the affected area one to three times a day. To help you remember to use diflorasone, apply it around the same time every day. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Use diflorasone exactly as directed. Do not use more or less of it or use it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

Wash or soak the affected area thoroughly before applying the medicine, unless it irritates your skin. Then apply the ointment or cream sparingly in a thin film and rub it in gently.

If you are using diflorasone on your face, keep it out of your eyes.

If you are using diflorasone on a child's diaper area, do not use tight-fitting diapers or plastic pants. Such use may increase side effects.

Do not apply cosmetics or other skin preparations on the treated area without talking with your doctor.

Do not wrap or bandage the treated area unless your doctor tells you to. If your doctor tells you to wrap or bandage the treated area, follow these instructions:

1. Soak the area in water or wash it well.
2. While the skin is moist, gently rub the medication into the affected areas.
3. Cover the area with plastic wrap (such as Saran Wrap or Handi-Wrap). The plastic may be held in place with a gauze or elastic bandage or adhesive tape on the normal skin beside the treated area. (Instead of using plastic wrap, plastic gloves may be used for the hands, plastic bags for the feet, or a shower cap for the scalp.)
4. Carefully seal the edges of the plastic to make sure the wrap adheres closely to the skin. If the affected area is moist, you can leave the edges of the plastic wrap partly unsealed or puncture the wrap to allow excess moisture to escape.
5. Leave the plastic wrapping in place as long as instructed by your doctor. Usually plastic wraps are left in place not more than 12 hours each day.
6. Cleanse the skin and reapply the medication each time a new plastic wrapping is applied.

Are there other uses for this medicine?

This medication may be prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.
Other names

* Psorcon®

* Psorcon E® Emollient Cream

What side effects can this medication cause?

Diflorasone may cause side effects. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately:

* skin burning, itching, or irritation
* dry skin
* rash
* increased hair growth
* skin discoloration

Long-term use of diflorasone may cause children to grow more slowly. Talk to your doctor about the risks of using this medication.

Diflorasone may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual problems while using this medication.

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online [at http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch] or by phone [1-800-332-1088].
What should I do if I forget to take a dose?

Apply the missed dose as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not apply a double dose to make up for a missed one.
What storage conditions are needed for this medication?

Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Throw away any medication that is outdated or no longer needed. Talk to your pharmacist about the proper disposal of your medication.
What other information should I know?

Keep all appointments with your doctor and the laboratory. Your doctor may order certain lab tests to check your body's response to diflorasone.

Do not let anyone else use your medication. Do not use this medication for a skin condition other than the one for which it was prescribed. Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about refilling your prescription.

It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.

Pseudoephedrine

Why is this medication prescribed?

Pseudoephedrine is used to relieve nasal congestion caused by colds, allergies, and hay fever. It is also used to temporarily relieve sinus congestion and pressure. Pseudoephedrine will relieve symptoms but will not treat the cause of the symptoms or speed recovery. Pseudoephedrine is in a class of medications called nasal decongestants. It works by causing narrowing of the blood vessels in the nasal passages.
How should this medication be used?

Pseudoephedrine comes as a regular tablet, a 12-hour extended-release (long-acting) tablet, a 24-hour extended-release tablet, and a solution (liquid) to be taken by mouth. The regular tablets and liquid are usually taken every 4 to 6 hours. The 12-hour extended-release tablets usually are taken every 12 hours, and you should not take more than two doses in a 24-hour period. The 24-hour extended-release tablets usually are taken once a day, and you should not take more than one dose in a 24-hour period. To help prevent trouble sleeping, take the last dose of the day several hours before bedtime. Follow the directions on the package label or on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take pseudoephedrine exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor or directed on the label.

Pseudoephedrine comes alone and in combination with other medications. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for advice on which product is best for your symptoms. Check nonprescription cough and cold product labels carefully before using 2 or more products at the same time. These products may contain the same active ingredient(s) and taking them together could cause you to receive an overdose. This is especially important if you will be giving cough and cold medications to a child.

Nonprescription cough and cold combination products, including products that contain pseudoephedrine, can cause serious side effects or death in young children. Do not give other nonprescription pseudoephedrine products to children younger than 4 years of age. If you give these products to children 4-11 years of age, use caution and follow the package directions carefully. Do not give pseudoephedrine extended-release tablets to children younger than 12 years of age.

If you are giving pseudoephedrine or a combination product that contains pseudoephedrine to a child, read the package label carefully to be sure that it is the right product for a child of that age. Do not give pseudoephedrine products that are made for adults to children.

Before you give a pseudoephedrine product to a child, check the package label to find out how much medication the child should receive. Give the dose that matches the child's age on the chart. Ask the child's doctor if you don't know how much medication to give the child.

If you are taking the liquid, do not use a household spoon to measure your dose. Use the measuring spoon or cup that came with the medication or use a spoon made especially for measuring medication.

If your symptoms do not get better within 7 days or if you have a fever, stop taking pseudoephedrine and call your doctor.

Swallow the extended-release tablets whole; do not break, crush, or chew them.
Are there other uses for this medicine?

This medication is also sometimes used to prevent ear pain and blockage caused by pressure changes during air travel or underwater diving. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

This medication is sometimes prescribed for other uses; ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.
Other names

* Advil® Allergy Sinus (as a combination product containing Chlorpheniramine, Ibuprofen, Pseudoephedrine)
* Advil® Cold and Sinus (as a combination product containing Ibuprofen, Pseudoephedrine)
* Afrinol®
* Alavert® D (as a combination product containing Loratadine, Pseudoephedrine)
* Allergy Relief D (as a combination product containing Cetirizine, Pseudoephedrine)
* Bromdex® (as a combination product containing Brompheniramine, Dextromethorphan, Pseudoephedrine)
* Bromfed® (as a combination product containing Brompheniramine, Dextromethorphan, Pseudoephedrine)
* Carbofed® DM (as a combination product containing Brompheniramine, Dextromethorphan, Pseudoephedrine)
* Cenafed®
* Cetiri D (as a combination product containing Cetirizine, Pseudoephedrine)
* Chlor Trimeton® Nasal Decongestant
* Clarinex-D® (as a combination product containing Desloratadine, Pseudoephedrine)
* Claritin-D® (as a combination product containing Desloratadine, Pseudoephedrine)
* Congestaclear®
* Contac®
* Corzall® (as a combination product containing Carbetapentane, Pseudoephedrine, Pyrilamine)
* Dimetapp® Decongestant
* Drixoral® Non-Drowsy Formula
* Drymax® (as a combination product containing Chlorpheniramine, Methscopolamine, Pseudoephedrine)
* Efidac®
* Endacof® PD (as a combination product containing Brompheniramine, Dextromethorphan, Pseudoephedrine)
* Entex®
* Exall® (as a combination product containing Carbetapentane, Guaifenesin, Pseudoephedrine)
* Exefen® (as a combination product containing Guaifenesin, Pseudoephedrine)
* Genaphed®
* LoHist® (as a combination product containing Brompheniramine, Pseudoephedrine)

* Mucinex® D (as a combination product containing Guaifenesin, Pseudoephedrine)
* Myfedrine®
* Myphetane® Dx (as a combination product containing Brompheniramine, Dextromethorphan, Pseudoephedrine)
* Nasofed®
* Pseudocot®
* Pseudodine® (as a combination product containing Pseudoephedrine, Triprolidine)
* Q-Fed®
* Ridafed®
* Semprex-D® (as a combination product containing Acrivastine, Pseudoephedrine)
* Seudotabs®
* Silfedrine®
* Sudafed®
* Sudatex-DM® (as a combination product containing Dextromethorphan, Guaifenesin, Pseudoephedrine)
* Sudodrin®
* Sudogest®
* Sudrine®
* Superfed®
* Suphedrin®
* Tekral® (as a combination product containing Diphenhydramine, Pseudoephedrine)
* Triacin® (as a combination product containing Pseudoephedrine, Triprolidine)
* Triaminic® A.M.
* Unifed®
* Uni-Sed®
* Zotex-D® (as a combination product containing Carbetapentane, Pseudoephedrine, Pyrilamine)
* Zyrtec-D® (as a combination product containing Cetirizine, Pseudoephedrine)


What special precautions should I follow?

Before taking pseudoephedrine,

* tell your doctor and pharmacist if you are allergic to pseudoephedrine, any other medications, or any of the inactive ingredients in the pseudoephedrine product you plan to take. Check the package label for a list of the ingredients.
* do not take pseudoephedrine if you are taking a monoamine oxidase (MAO) inhibitor such as isocarboxazid (Marplan), phenelzine (Nardil), selegiline (Eldepryl, Emsam, Zelapar), and tranylcypromine (Parnate), or if you have stopped taking one of these medications within the past 2 weeks.
* tell your doctor and pharmacist what prescription and nonprescription medications, vitamins, nutritional supplements, and herbal products you are taking or plan to take. Be sure to mention medications for diet or appetite control, asthma, colds, or high blood pressure.
* tell your doctor if you have or have ever had high blood pressure, glaucoma (a condition in which increased pressure in the eye can lead to gradual loss of vision), diabetes, difficulty urinating (due to an enlarged prostate gland), or thyroid or heart disease. If you plan to take the 24-hour extended-release tablets, tell your doctor if you have had a narrowing or blockage of your digestive system.
* tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breast-feeding. If you become pregnant while taking pseudoephedrine, call your doctor.
* if you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you are taking pseudoephedrine.

What special dietary instructions should I follow?

Foods and drinks that contain large amounts of caffeine can make the side effects of pseudoephedrine worse.

What side effects can this medication cause?

Pseudoephedrine may cause side effects. Tell your doctor if any of these symptoms are severe or do not go away:

* restlessness
* nausea
* vomiting
* weakness
* headache

Some side effects can be serious. If you experience any of the following symptoms, call your doctor immediately:

* nervousness
* dizziness
* difficulty sleeping
* stomach pain
* difficulty breathing
* fast, pounding, or irregular heartbeat

Pseudoephedrine may cause other side effects. Call your doctor if you have any unusual problems while you are taking this medication.

If you experience a serious side effect, you or your doctor may send a report to the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program online [at http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch] or by phone [1-800-332-1088].
What should I do if I forget to take a dose?

This medication is usually taken as needed. If your doctor has told you to take pseudoephedrine regularly, take the missed dose as soon as you remember it. However, if it is almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose and continue your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one.
What should I do in case of overdose?

In case of overdose, call your local poison control center at 1-800-222-1222. If the victim has collapsed or is not breathing, call local emergency services at 911.
What storage conditions are needed for this medication?

Keep this medication in the container it came in, tightly closed, and out of reach of children. Store it at room temperature and away from excess heat and moisture (not in the bathroom). Throw away any medication that is outdated or no longer needed. Talk to your pharmacist about the proper disposal of your medication.
What other information should I know?

If you are taking the 24-hour extended-release tablets, you may notice something that looks like a tablet in your stool. This is just the empty tablet shell, and this does not mean that you did not get your complete dose of medication.

Ask your pharmacist any questions you have about pseudoephedrine.

It is important for you to keep a written list of all of the prescription and nonprescription (over-the-counter) medicines you are taking, as well as any products such as vitamins, minerals, or other dietary supplements. You should bring this list with you each time you visit a doctor or if you are admitted to a hospital. It is also important information to carry with you in case of emergencies.


Important warning

FDA Intends to Remove Some Unapproved Cough, Cold, and Allergy Drugs from the Market

This safety alert does not apply to this medication, but only to some products which contain this medication. In addition, it is important that you know that there is not a problem with most of the products described in this medication monograph. And some drug companies may decide to seek full approval from the FDA so that they can continue marketing their products.

On March 2, 2011, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a safety alert about certain unapproved prescription cough, cold, and allergy products containing this drug in combination with other drugs. These products are not currently approved by the FDA for safety, effectiveness, and quality. FDA asked drug companies to stop shipping most of these products for sale in the US within the next 6 months. Although some of these products have been marketed for many years, laws about what a company must prove to FDA for drug product approval have gotten tougher and increased enforcement of these laws is now taking place. The FDA took this action due to concerns about certain potential risks associated with use of these medications. These risks may include:

the possibility of improper use in infants and young children

potentially risky combinations of ingredients

patients receiving too much or too little of the medication because of problems with the way some ''timed-release'' products are made

If you are concerned that the prescription cough, cold, and allergy medication you are taking is not approved by the FDA, you should talk to your doctor or pharmacist. If the medication you are taking is not approved, your doctor can prescribe another prescription medication or your doctor or pharmacist can suggest an over-the-counter (OTC) cough, cold, and allergy product for your condition. There are many safe and effective alternative approved products that can be taken instead. Your doctor probably prescribed the medicine without knowing that FDA had not approved it. This is because it has been so difficult for doctors and pharmacists to find out that these products are unapproved. For additional information:

You can visit the FDA website (http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm244852.htm) for more information about this action to remove unapproved cough, cold, and allergy products from the market.

You can find a list of unapproved products by going to (http://www.fda.gov/Safety/MedWatch/SafetyInformation/SafetyAlertsforHumanMedicalProducts/ucm245279.htm).

For information on how to dispose of unused products, go to http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm101653.htm.